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A Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island

São Miguel is the largest of 9 volcanic islands in the Azores Archipelago. This autonomous region of Portugal is located in the North Atlantic Ocean about 1,500km off the coast of Lisbon and 3,900km from the east coast of North America.

The Azores aren’t the most accessible holiday destination, however this has changed in recent years. In 2015, low cost, direct flights to the islands were introduced, and for better or for worse, this has led to a rise in tourism. More on this later.

We were in São Miguel for about a week, and, even though we did a lot, I know we barely scratched the surface of this pretty, (and unbelievably green) little island. Seriously… it’s the greenest and most beautiful place I’ve ever been… even over Ireland.

To prove it, I haven’t edited any of the photos in this article… yes, it’s REALLY that green!

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

When to Visit

Peak season in São Miguel is from July to August… so (as you might expect) this is the one time I would NOT suggest for you to go. Sure, the weather is nice, but you’ll also be experiencing the island at its busiest.

Keep in mind that the word “busy” is pretty relative here. Peak season in the Azores is still far more calm than “peak season” in other unbearably busy travel hotspots.

We visited in early April and experienced some pretty hectic weather conditions. It was sunny one second and blazing hot… then we’d get a torrential downpour and the temperature dropped.

We also had a whole lot of peace and quiet. In most cases, we were the only ones at the view points, lakes, and other places we visited.

According to locals, it’s not uncommon to experience all four seasons in a day here. No matter when you visit, the weather will be unpredictable, so pack accordingly!


What to Do

Visit Sete Cidades

The lakes themselves are obviously the highlight in this district… but lots of people who “visit them” make the mistake of only experiencing them from the viewpoints. If you come all this way, be sure to head down to explore the trails and villages surrounding the lakes, too.

Weather permitting, you can do lots of activities here.

Our plan was to spend a day kayaking, SUP boarding, and biking, but mother nature had other plans. It was insanely windy, so we were only able to bike… which is probably a good thing given that it was also pretty cold and water activities might have led to pneumonia.

We spent a full three hours biking and taking in epic, moody views of the lake.

There are also lots of hiking and walking trials around the lakes, but, even with a mountain bike, you can only get so far. Ditch your bike and explore a bit!

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

Attempt a water activity (or Explore Ponta Delgada)

Ponta Delgada is the capital of the Azores. The city’s main harbor is located here, and so are lots of companies offering water sports rentals and other water activities.

We were planning to go swimming with dolphins… and were willing to brave the freezing water to do so… but (once again) mother nature said, “NOT TODAY, FELICIA!”

We were put on a whale watching tour instead, but, sadly, this didn’t pan out either…

We boarded our boat, had a quick safety briefing, and then, while attempting to leave the harbor, were informed that one of the boat’s engines wasn’t working properly… which is why we had been driving in circles since leaving the dock.

We didn’t see any whales that day, but we did get a nice 360 view of the harbor as the boat captains fought against the faulty engines to get us back to land.

It was a big bummer that we weren’t able to experience the abundance of wildlife the Azores are known for, but it was also the first of many lessons in going with the flow on this trip.

Instead of freezing our butts off on/in the water, we spent the day walking around Ponta Delgada, along the coast, and enjoying the surprisingly sunny weather.

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

Visit the Gorreana Tea Factory

Family owned and operated since 1883, the Gorreana Tea Factory is the oldest in Europe and, currently, the only remaining tea plantation on the continent. Located on the northern coast of the island, it covers an impressive 32 acres and produces about 33 tons of tea each year.

It was really cool to see workers in the fields processing the tea, (which, according to the guys, looked like they were “just trimming the hedges”).

There is also an on-site museum you can walk through to learn more about the tea making process, to have a cup of tea, or buy some souvenirs to take home! I unintentionally bought a box of Gorreana’s green tea at one of the supermarkets before visiting the plantation, and can confirm that it is in fact really good.

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

Take a hike

…and I mean this in the nicest way possible!

On nice days, this particular viewpoint boasts unbeatable panoramic views of the island and crater lakes below. I know this because it was a photo of this hike in particular that immediately sold us on coming here.

Unfortunately, we had no such luck when visiting Miradouro da Boca do Inferno…

…As a matter of fact, it was a real instagram versus reality situation - (and if you don’t believe me, just google what it looks like on a clear day to see for yourself).

As you can see, we couldn’t really see much of anything… but it was cool having our heads up in the clouds for a bit!

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

Take a detour through the Valley of Lombadas

The drive through the valley was incredible!

The best part - we didn’t pass a single car or see another person the entire time.

Once you reach the bottom, you’ll see some walking trails and an abandoned crumbling building which we all eventually climbed up on - Lindsey, Laura and I to snap some photos… and Andrew to perform his rendition of Cher’s smash hit, “Believe.”

Said a performance will now live on ‘til the end of time in (shaky because I was laughing so hard) GIPH form. You’re welcome.

If you make the drive to the valley WEAR GOOD (OLD) SHOES so you can explore.

Also, keep an eye out for the waterfall along the way!

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

take a dip in furnas’ Hot springs

We visited Poça da Dona Beija, and it was one of the only places we went on the island where we saw more than half a dozen other people.

Though it was a bit busy (and raining) we still really enjoyed it. The rain was actually quite refreshing while sitting in the steaming pools.

There are also natural hot springs at the Caldeira Velha Nature Reserve.

I totally did not even know this was a thing due to poor planning (and an overall lack of research) beforehand… which was a pretty common theme throughout the whole trip.

I can’t confirm whether it’s actually a good spot to go, but it looks cool enough to tempt me back in to a second visit… as if I really need tempting…

Pro tip: Most of the hot springs charge guests a small entrance fee (and an additional fee for extras like lockers and towels). Save some money and bring your own towel if you can!

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

GET LOST

Again… I mean this in the nicest way possible.

It’s an island, so, it’s kind of impossible to really get lost… but you can try.

Get off the main roads. Get off your bike.

Take the path less travelled and go until the path runs out.

Perhaps you’ll find nothing… you’ll definitely find some graving cows… or you might just find another incredible view.

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

Unique Eats + Drinks

eat Cozida Das Furnas

While visiting Furnas, make sure to try Cozida das Furnas, or volcanic stew. This traditional stew is cooked underground with volcanic heat… and tastes super delicious!

Lots of restaurants in the area serve up this unique dish, but if you want to actually see it being taken out of the ground, you’ll have to get here early.

Around noon, workers head to the “cooking holes” locally known as Fumarolas to remove the cooking pots from the ground and transport them to the restaurants around the region.

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

drink Purple tea

While visiting Furnas, head to the Chalet da Tia Mercês for a quirky cup of tea. Water from the nearby mineral rich hot springs causes this green tea to turn purple!

Unfortunately, we made the mistake of leaving this stop til our last day on the island.

Turns out, the tea house was closing early for a private event, when we arrived they told us they had just served their last customer for the day! I considered begging and pleading and telling them it was our last day, but decided I’d suck it up, take the high road and plan a purple tea return trip instead!

No purple tea shots this time around, but here’s a cool photo from their outdoor patio overlooking some steaming geothermal holes… (and it was then that I truly realized we were on holiday on an active volcano)… no big deal!

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

Getting Around

So, this was the one tricky part about our trip to São Miguel…

Andrew and I arrived a couple of days ahead of our friends, so we just got around Ponta Delgada on foot. I don’t know that I’d recommend this, especially after dark… because the cars drove extremely fast and the sidewalks were just about non-existent.

Walking/hitch-hiking can for sure be done… but it isn’t necessarily the safest option.

Buses and taxis are also an option for getting around the island, but they can both be a bit expensive depending on where you’re going. Plus, the buses aren’t the most convenient choice as they run pretty infrequently throughout the day.

If you plan on exploring a lot of the island, your best bet is to rent a car.

I would recommend this if you are travelling as a group and can split the cost, though, even if you’re travelling solo and doing a lot of bouncing around, it would likely work out cheaper to just pay the daily fee for a rental car.

For example, a taxi from Ponta Delgada to Furnas would have cost us anywhere from 40-50Euros…and that’s just one way. It’s much more cost efficient to just rent a car. Plus, this will give you the added convenience of exploring the island at your leisure.

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

Where We Stayed

Ponta Delgada

When Andrew and I arrived in São Miguel, we spent two nights in Ponta Delgada.

This was a good starting point for us because of its proximity to the airport (and to the harbor where we were supposed to meet for the dolphin swimming excursion the following morning), but it is farther from’s the islands other hot spots like Sete Cidades and the hot springs in Furnas (no pun intended).

We were tired from our journey, so it was nice to have only have a short cab ride between the airport and our cozy home away from home.

Both places we stayed were nice, but we hit the AirBnb jackpot with this first property.

The beautiful glass loft was covered in greenery on the outside and tastefully decorated on the inside. We had a fully equipped kitchen, washing machine, an outdoor patio, plus, an amazing panoramic view of the ocean, mountains, and the pineapple farm next door.

View the listing: Mirante Loft

The host Joana will also be reopening an eco-hotel on the property next year.

Read more: Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

Vila Franca Do Campo

Our second AirBnb in Vila Franca Do Campo was a bit more centrally located.

The three bedroom house was right by the ocean and had all of the amenities we needed!

View the listing: Three Bedroom House with Ocean View

From here, we could get just about anywhere on the island within 30-40 minutes by car (with obvious photo pit stops along the way). It was a lot quieter than Ponta Delgada, (which was nice and peaceful), but also meant we had a lot fewer options for dining out.

We took advantage of the fully equipped kitchen, and saved money on food by cooking most of our meals at home.

Overall, both AirBnbs were incredible with very helpful and responsive hosts.

New to Airbnb? Click here to sign up and get a discount on your first booking!

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

Know Before You Go

First and foremost, this is not a party destination.

Sure, the wine is cheap… but you won’t find a buzzing “nightlife scene” here. If that’s what you’re looking for, you’re better off going elsewhere.

Secondly, as mentioned in the beginning of this article, the Azores have become an increasingly popular destination among tourists in recent years. Since São Miguel is the easiest to reach, the rise in the number of tourists visiting each year has been more drastic here.

This is great for the economy, but, for obvious reasons, also poses a serious negative threat to the very thing the islands are famous for - their raw and natural beauty.

Sustainable tourism is a hot topic everywhere, and the Azores are no exception.

If you’re planning a trip here, BE MINDFUL. Respect the locals, the land, and leave each place as beautiful as you find it.

Thirdly… (is this a word? third of all? idk?)…

…if you’ve been considering a trip to these beautiful islands, NOW is the time.

Map

Need some help getting around? I’ve pinned all of the places we visited, (and the spots that are on my list for next time) in the interactive map below!


Planning a trip to São Miguel?

PIN THIS POST TO SAVE IT FOR LATER!

How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld
How to Spend a Week in São Miguel: The Ultimate Guide to the Azores’ Largest Island | HallAroundtheWorld

The Ultimate Guide to Lisbon - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28)

Lisbon is the second oldest and one of the least expensive capital cities in Europe… that is, if you manage to steer clear of tuk-tuks, tourist traps, and pick pockets.

If it’s your first time visiting, you’re in for a treat! - The city is as modern and colorful as it is rich in culture and history… and one week here just was not long enough.

Keep reading for some tips on what to know before you go, the best times to visit, and unique things to do… that aren’t riding tram 28.


What To Do

There is SO much to do in Lisbon… and, consequently, so much that I haven’t done yet.

This list contains mostly things I did do and see, (as I don’t really find it ethical to write about things I’ve never experienced for myself), however, I did include some of the things I’ll definitely be going back for.

Some of them were missed due to lack of time, poor weather, or, in some cases, sheer ignorance of their existence, soooo, in an effort to make sure you don’t make the same mistakes I did (ie. not researching properly ahead of time) here are, in no particular order, the best things we did in Lisbon… and a few that are still on my list!

First and foremost…


eat your weight in Pastéis da nata

If you eat ANYTHING in Lisbon, let it be these… and lots of em.

As the story goes, these sweet, crumbly, delicious egg tarts, otherwise known as pastel de nata, originated at the Jerónimos Monastery in Belém.

The nuns and monks at the time used high quantities of egg whites to starch their clothing… and then used the leftover yolks in desserts. Thus, the birth of this heavenly treat - (pun slightly intended)!

The monks began selling these pastéis de nata to raise money for the Monastery, and did so until 1834 when it closed. The secret recipe was sold to the owners of the local sugar refinery, who then opened the Fábrica de Pastéis de Belém in 1837.

Today, you can get pastel de natas pretty much anywhere in Lisbon, but, supposedly, those served up by Fábrica de Pastéis de Belém are the best. They may be the best, but they also win the award for the longest lines… and we tended to steer clear of those on this trip.

Wherever you go for this yummy treat, get one for each hand… and add some cinnamon or sugar for good measure!

The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld

Visit the lx factory

In 2008, an abandoned industrial complex by the river got a serious makeover, and Ta-Dahhh!… the LX Factory was born.

Today, the historical complex is home to several cafes, restaurants, shops, a super cool bookstore, bars… and, my personal favorite, art! Lots of art - including an amazing trash, bumblebee sculpture by Portuguese street artist, Bordalo II.

If you’re a fan of urban art, you won’t want to miss this colorful and buzzing area.

There is also a flea market here on Sundays… something I wish I had known about earlier. If the timing is right, you should definitely check that out… and then let me know how it is! ;)

The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld

hunt for street art

The LX Factory isn’t the only place where you’ll find cool street art. As a matter of fact, Lisbon has, on more than one occasion, been called an “open air art exhibit.”

As if the tiled facades and terracotta roofs aren’t swoon-worthy enough, massive murals tastefully bring back life and color to once drab and deteriorating walls all around the city.

Street art isn’t entirely legal, but it is supported by Lisbon’s city council. Artists present them with their ideas and the council decides if the project will be allowed.

Whether or not this goes against the rebellious sentiments underlying urban art is still up for debate. Regardless, it’s pretty cool that Lisbon’s street art is mostly legal, supported by the government… and literally everywhere.

The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld


Visit the MAAT

The Museum of Art, Architecture, and Technology, located just beside the Tagus river (and not far from the LX factory) is not your average Portuguese building.

We decided to just enjoy the MAAT from the outside, but if you’re a big archi buff you might want to actually go IN the museum, too.

The steps in front are a nice place to people watch and soak up the sun… or you can walk up onto the roof for a great view of the river and the 25 de Abril bridge.

After visiting the MAAT, we walked over to the LX Factory, and found a pretty insta-worthy swing along the way.

The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld

Get your culture on at Lisbon’s Unesco sites

If you make it all the way out the the MAAT, you might as well swing over to the Belém Tower and the Jerónimos Monastery, too.

They are about a 25-30 minute walk away from the MAAT, so, no, not superrrr close, but definitely much closer than sayyy Alfama, (which would take you about two hours by foot).

The Belém Tower was built on the shores of the Tagus river in the 1500’s to defend the city, and, the Monastery, as previously mentioned, is the home of THE pastel de nata! Both are now UNESCO World Heritage sites and two of Lisbon’s most iconic monuments.

We sadly didn’t make it to either due to poor planning, dicey weather conditions (and, if I’m being totally honest, HUNGER!), but definitely plan on making the trip next time!

Keep in mind that there is a small admission fee for both of these sites.

go on a free walking tour

If I’m being totally honest with you, I’ve never been a big fan of big group tours.

I typically prefer to explore new places solo and at my own pace… however, I’ll admit, after going on several Christmas Market tours last winter, I realized that I’ve been seriously missing out on a gold mine of information.

Instead of just going around “seeing” a bunch of things, walking tours allow you to learn about what you’re seeing - the history and meaning behind a city’s architecture, foods, and traditions. They’re also a great way to meet people if you’re travelling solo… (and to get your steps in)!

Unfortunately, the timing and weather conditions didn’t work out in our favor… but NEXT TIME a Lisbon walking tour is at the top of our list… (right after a day trip to Sintra).

The tour we planned to do was run through a company called Civitatis, an online travel company that operates in over 770 destinations and offers over 17,000 activities.

They have four free walking tours in Lisbon (as well as some other pretty cool activities and Lisbon must haves):

  • Walking Tour of Lisbon takes place everyday at 10am, 11am, 2pm, and 4pm. This tour visits some of the cities most emblematic locations like the São Pedro de Alcântara viewpoint and Santa Justa Elevator.

  • Walking Tour of Alfama typically takes place daily at 10:30am and 11am. It explores Lisbon’s oldest district and includes stops at the Lisbon Cathedral and Portas do Sol viewpoint.

  • Walking Tour of Mouraria typically begins daily at 11am. On this tour, you’ll visit the Medieval Moorish Quarter, the birth place of fado and the neighborhood of Graça, an area known for its miradouros and panoramic views.

  • Walking Tour of Bairro Alto & Chiado takes place daily at 3pm. On this tour you’ll explore the most bohemian areas in Lisbon, visit the areas oldest coffeehouse, and follow the route of the emblematic (and instaworthy) yellow Elevador da Bica.

Each tour takes about 2.5-3 hours and is (almost) totally free!

Here’s the catch - Though booking the tour itself won’t cost you anything, it is customary to give your guide a tip at the end. Most guides work exclusively on tips, so keep that in mind when deciding how much you will give.

Book your spot ahead of time by visiting Civitatis.com or clicking any of the tour links above!

The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld

Visit rossio lisbon square

This lively square is literally in the heart of the city.

It was renamed Pedro IV Square in 1874 when the statue of Dom Pedro the IV was put up, but most residents still refer to it as Rossio.

Like most city squares, this is where life happens.

When we visited, there was a market going on with loads of stalls selling flowers, food (and also giving samples), drinks (mulled wine), jewelry, tiles (of course), products made of cork, and other handicrafts.

Fun fact: Did you know that Portugal is the biggest cork producer in the world? So don’t be surprised when you see (tourist) shops filled with cork bags, wallets, bracelets, and other knickknacks you didn’t know existed in cork form.

The second time we visited the square, we witnessed a big group of med students utilizing what was hands down the most effective fundraising method I’ve ever seen.

First year students in yellow t-shirts sat on the ground, while older students in black cloaks stood behind them. They sang song after song and were dancing and clapping… and before long the music and energy had drawn a big crowd.

One of the students walked around to on-lookers explaining who they were, why they were singing, and what they were raising money for. He told us, “if you make a donation, we throw you a big party.” So of course we did.

For each donation, there was lots of clapping and cheering… always followed by another song.

GENIUS!

Street performances by cloaked student troubadours, or tunas are pretty common around Portugal… and in this square in particular. If you’re lucky, maybe you’ll catch one yourself!

The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld

watch a fado performance

If you skim the web for things to do in Lisbon, I guarantee you that “Fado + Dinner Show” will come up. Fado is traditional Portuguese music that is very melancholy and sad, which, for whatever reason, seems to pair best with dinner and drinks.

These dinner and a show combos are super popular among visitors to Portugal and, thus, a pretty common way for tourists to get ripped off… which is what almost happened to us…

More on that here: Travel Tales - Fado Problems and Hair Flips Solutions

Long story short… We decided late in the afternoon on Andrew’s last day in Lisbon that we would go for dinner and a fado show to celebrate his birthday that night. We did very little (ie zero) research on where to go or how to avoid getting scammed, soooo, basically… we nearly fell into one of the aforementioned tourist traps.

Side note: Are you noticing a theme here? I literally did not plan annnything prior to this trip!

Thankfully, after a little hair flip action and some Oscar worthy acting from Lindsey and Andrew, we got our money back and left to find a more affordable spot to get our fado fix.

We soon found a buzzing little hole in the wall restaurant. There was a bit of a wait, and they were still charging a per person cover at the door to reserve tables, however, 100% of this money went towards our bill at the end.

Our experience here was much more intimate and cozy… and budget friendly.

The fado singer found out it was Andrew’s birthday and gave him his own little encore. I wish I had photos of this because a picture is worth a thousand words, but I don’t… so HERE’S A GIPH INSTEAD… which has to be worth at least a million.

Despite the little mishaps along the way, our dinner + fado evening ended up being one of my favorite nights of the whole trip, and proof that you CAN get a good meal and a fado experience without spending an arm and a leg.

eat your heart out at the time out market

The Time Out Market is a fairly new concept that got it’s start in Lisbon in 2014.

On one side, there are shops and bars, a music venue, and you can get a taste of the best restaurants in the city. The other side is home to the city’s most well known (and according to Time Out), longest-running vendors of meat, fish, fruit, and flowers.

As the Time Out Market has increased in popularity, so have the prices, but, in my opinion, it’s still well worth a visit… that is, if you go early and can actually find a spot to sit.

There are so many delicious food options, and we had a lot of them… but my FAVORITE dish by far was the tuna tataki from Confraria - it was TA DIE FOR!

Side note… and a pro tip for my fellow females with small bladders: If you so happen to need to use the toilet while you’re here (which you probably will if you, like me, eat your heart out AND split a bottle of wine with your girlfriends) go to the bathroom upstairs!

When the market gets busy, the line for the women’s bathroom on the first floor gets atrociously long… so long that I felt it imperative to give you fair warning in this article!! I didn’t realize the upstairs bathroom was a thing until I went back to the market a second time… so, yeah. Sharing is caring.

This is currently the only Time Out Market, however, the publishing company is opening another one in Miami in two days! (May 9, 2019).

Several other Time Out Markets are due to open in the next couple of years in major cities around the world (including London, Prague, New York, Montreal, Boston, and Chicago)!

The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld

WATCH THE SUNSET AT A rooftop bar

There are loads of popular rooftop bars around the city, like Rio Maravilha (located at the LX Factory), Park, SkyBar, TOPO… the list goes on.

We went to Park around sunset, and, as you can imagine, it was packeddd.

If you look carefully in the picture below, you’ll see the partial heads of all the people in front of me taking the same photo.

Good view: yes

Pricey drinks: also yes

Best thing I experienced in Lisbon: not quite

The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld

get a free view at a miradouro

Want to save yourself a few bucks? Skip the bars, grab a bottle of wine, and head to one of Lisbon’s many Miradouros instead!

These viewpoints offer stunning (free!) views of the city, and are a great place to watch the sunset, or to just stop and chill after a day of exploring. Street performers often play music in these areas, too… making them an even more appealing alternative to overcrowded (and often overpriced) rooftop bars.

Miradouro de Santa Luzia is one of the most popular viewpoints (and is located conveniently on the way to my favorite wine bar in the city, Alfama Gourmet).

The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld

Try the local wine

Okay… let’s be honest - Trying Portuguese wine probably should have been right up top with eating your weight in pastel de natas… but now it’s coming in at the "LAST BUT CERTAINLY NOT LEAST” spot on the list.

Portuguese wines, like ports and vinho verde (or green wine), are made from varieties of grapes that aren’t really found anywhere else in the world. It’s also unlikely that you’ll find these wines being sold anywhere else in the world at such bargain prices… so get your fill of it while you can… and while you’re at it, get yourself a cheese plate, too!

Pro tip: The best wine bar we visited in Lisbon was Alfama Gourmet.

We were able to try and learn about so many different Portuguese wines and had great chats with the owner Nuno… all while watching Tram 28 occasionally breeze by the window. We also tried Ginjinha shots here, a traditional Portuguese liquor served up in a tasty little chocolate “shot glass.”

Read more: The Best Wine Bar in Lisbon, Portugal

The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld

So what’s the deal with Tram 28?

OKAY, I’ll admit it! We DID take the tram! ONCE!

We were actually on our way to visit Alfama for oneee last wine date, and didn’t want to brave the neighborhood’s steep hills after several days of walking around the free of charge stair master that is Lisbon.

We saw the tram pulling up to the stop just ahead, so we thought, “Eh, why not!? When in Lisbon!”

It was fun and exciting for the first couple minutes, and, after that… it was a tram… a super bumpy tram. To be honest, I don’t see what all the hype is about. I much preferred the view OF the passing tram… from the wine bar… with a cheese plate…

Not pictured: me nearly falling over while trying to record this time-lapse.

Pro tip: If you DO have a “When in Lisbon” moment and decide to take the tram, for the love of green wine, please don’t do it in the middle of the day… and if you DO decide to take it in the middle of the day, don’t get on in the city center when it’s already packed with people (and possibly pick pockets) - I personally never had an issue with this, but, according to the interwebs… and the locals who told me to wear my backpack on my chest, it is in fact a thing.

When To Go

Peak season in Lisbon is from June to August, so this, in my opinion, is when you most definitely should not go.

The weather may be nice during this time, but the cues and crowds are not. For a more enjoyable experience, go just before or after this period - from March to June or September to October. The weather will still be warm and the city will be much less busy.

Getting Around

The best way to explore Lisbon is definitely by foot. You get to explore all of the random side streets and alleyways, pop in to random shops and restaurants at a moments notice, and get a gnarly uphill workout free of charge.

On that note - Bring good shoes!!

Uber is also a great option when you have a bit further to go to reach your destination (or when the weather isn’t great).

We opted for getting an Uber from the airport and when going from our AirBnb in Alfama to the Museum of Art, Architecture, and Technology (MAAT) - (solely because it was raining, all the way on the other side of town, and it would have taken us an hour to get there by foot)… otherwise we pretty much always walked.

Heading to another city in Portugal?

After visiting Lisbon, we headed to Porto by bus, and (once we found the bus stop and figured out how to print our tickets) found it to be pretty straight forward.

We were there within 3.5 hours and then had a 5 minute ride from the bus station to our AirBnb once we arrived. Tickets cost 17 Euros one way (34euro RT) and can be booked on Rede Expressos website.

Another option is flying or taking the train.

Flights between these cities may be cheap, but when you factor in the extra baggage fees, time spent getting to the airport, the hassle of going through security, and then repeating that whole process again on the other end, you might as well just take a bus.

Taking a train is the fastest option (though not by very much - 3 hours as opposed to 3.5 by bus). It’s also the most expensive. The cheapest regular tickets are 25Euros one way, but can sometimes be purchased for a discounted rate. Visit Comboios De Portugal for more information regarding specific train times and ticket prices.

Story time/Pro tips for taking the bus:

When you get to the bus station at Lisboa Oriente, don’t make the mistake of going to the train station side… you’ll miss your bus and end up waiting another hour til the next one.

I realize I may not be selling this right now… We did have a pretty rough start, but I promise the bus is the most cost and time effective means of getting to Porto.

We were running late, the signage at the station was really poor, so when we got there, we had no clue where to go. Hopefully you can learn from our mistakes!

If you walk allllll the way to the far side of the parking lot (where all of the buses are), you’ll find another smaller building - This is where the information desk for the bus station is located, and possibly the same snarky information desk lady we never got answers from.

In this building, there’s also a red machine. The red machine is your friend.

If you booked your tickets online, go STRAIGHT to the ancient red machine and enter your booking number. Then your tickets will print and you might actually get some help from someone in terms of which bus stop platform you should go to.

We had to have the printed ticket for our bus from Lisbon to Porto, but, for whatever reason, on our way back to Lisbon, showing the tickets on our phone was fine - (The Porto station signage was also much better… in that there actually WERE signs).

Play it safe and always at least try to print the tickets from the red machine if you can!

Also, BYOS… in which case, the S obviously stands for snacks!

The bus does make a few pit stops along the route, but none of them are very long.


Useful Phrases

The official language spoken in Portugal, which may seem like a no brainer, but you’d be surprised by the number of people who think they can get by with Spanish here because of the proximity to Spain. Not the case. Here’s a quick little Portuguese lesson before you go.

Hello – Olá (oh-LAH)

Goodbye – Adeus (ah-DEH-oosh)

Please – Por favor (poor fah-VOHR)

Thank you (male) – Obrigado (oh-bree-GAH-doh)

Thank you (female) – Obrigada (oh-bree-GAH-dah)

It took me much longer than I would like to admit to figure out the meaning behind this pronunciation difference.


City Map

You didn’t think I’d give you all that info without some handy dandy directions did ya? Here’s an interactive map to help you get around while you’re in Lisbon.

If you have questions about what we did, where we stayed, or just want more Lisbon tips, feel free to leave a comment below or contact me directly!

Enjoy your time in Lisbon!


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The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld
The Ultimate Lisbon Guide - What to Know, When to Go, and 12+ Unique Things to Do (That Aren't Riding Tram 28) FREE MAP! | HallAroundTheWorld

Travel Tales: Fado Problems and Hair Flip Solutions

If you read any guide on what to do in Lisbon, chances are you’ll come across fado.

This traditional Portuguese music is moody and sad, and, for whatever reason, seems to be best paired with dinner and drinks.

Dinner with a fado show is a super popular activity for people visiting Lisbon (and Portugal in general), so, as it goes… it’s also a pretty common way for tourists to get ripped off… which is what almost happened to us.

DSC05823.jpg

We decided late in the afternoon on Andrew’s last day in Lisbon that we would go for dinner and a fado show to celebrate his birthday that night. We did very little (ie zero) research on where to go or how to avoid getting scammed, soooo, basically… we nearly fell into one of the aforementioned tourist traps.

(Side note: are you noticing a theme here? I literally did not plan annnything prior to this trip)!

Long story short… shortly after deciding on our fado dinner plans… like literally less than two minutes later, we walked by a cute restaurant with a big sign out front that said “FADO SHOW TONIGHT!”

…and then we went inside and booked a table for the four of us that evening!

Perfect, right?! It’s like the universe had been listening to our chat!

Well, not quite…

First mistake: Going into the first place we saw.

Turns out, there was a cover charge of 10 Euros a head… something the hostess didn’t tell us until after we had given her our name and contact information.

This was a bit of a red flag. In hindsight, we probably should have backed out then, but I hadn’t done any research to know any better, so I thought, “Well, technically we’re seeing a show. I guess paying a cover is normal,”

…and then, in our excited fado frenzy, we forked over 40 Euros.

Second and third mistake: Paying 40 Euros cover. Not looking at the menu.

As we continued on our walk back to our AirBnb, we started seeing (ie noticing for the first time) loads of restaurants with signs advertising fado shows that evening… many of which also had another one of my favorite words - “FREE!”

Still, we had already paid… so we decided to give the first spot a chance.

When we came back that night we quickly realized that this restaurant was a weeeee bit out of our “Nearing the End of a Two Week Holiday” price range

…and then (even more quickly) began concocting a “Let’s Get Our Money Back” and go somewhere else plan.

After a little hair flip action and some Oscar worthy acting from Lindsey and Andrew, we got our money back and began the hunt for a more affordable place to get our fado fix.

We found a buzzing restaurant with a bit of a wait, and though they still charged a per person cover at the door to reserve a table, 100% of this money went towards our bill at the end.

Our experience here was much more intimate and cozy… not to mention a whole lot easier on our bank accounts.

The fado singer found out it was Andrew’s birthday (because she was basically standing right beside our table the entire time) and gave him his own little encore.

I wish I had photos of this because a picture is worth a thousand words… but I don’t… so HERE’S A GIPH INSTEAD. That’s gotta be worth at least a million, right!? Just look at those birthday boy dance moves!

Despite the little mishaps along the way, our dinner + fado evening ended up being one of my favorite nights of the whole trip, and proof that it IS possible to get a great meal and a fun fado experience without paying an arm and a leg.

The moral of this story isn’t to do your research… because going with the flow actually turned out pretty well for us in the end.

The moral of this story is that even the most seasoned travellers make mistakes… and that there’s no problem a sassy little hair flip can’t solve.


Have you been to a fado show?

Was your experience as cool as Andrew’s? ;)

Let me know in the comments below!

The Best Wine Bar in Lisbon, Portugal

Sometimes, when I prepare for a trip, I map out the entire city beforehand.

I (over)ambitiously pin all of the restaurants, cafes, bars, and photo spots I want to hit. Then, when the time comes, I race around trying to make it to as many points on the map as I can.

This is all well and good, especially when you’re on a job, putting together a city guide, or shooting a video… but it is hardly a holiday. It’s another to do list.

I spent a solid four weeks travelling like this over the holidays last year - Bouncing from one Christmas market city to the next every couple of days, and running around like a mad woman trying to see and do everything in the meantime.

It was fun. A lot of fun… but it was also exhausting. So hectic that, when I got home, it hardly felt like I’d taken a break.

This was 10,000% NOT the case for my trip to Portugal.

All the plans I thought I had fell through, and I learned a big lesson in the art of sucking it up and going with the flow.

The Best Wine Bar in Lisbon, Portugal | HallAroundtheWorld

After spending a week in the Azores, we arrived in Lisbon with a minimal agenda and headed to the accommodation we’d booked a day prior… (after a cheeky little stop at the Time Out Market for some food... Okay, and wine).

We couldn’t check in to our AirBnb yet, so we decided to get out and explore Alfama instead.

Within minutes, we came across a hole in the wall wine bar.

Our passing, “Oooooh that place is cute” changed to “TWO euro wine!? Shall we?” once we saw the menu… And then we did.

The Best Wine Bar in Lisbon, Portugal | HallAroundtheWorld

It wasn’t a place I ever expected to find…

Even if I had actually planned out what I wanted to do in Lisbon, it’s unlikely that this little wine bar would have been on my radar. Regardless, Alfama Gourmet quickly became one of my favorite spots in Lisbon.

Maybe it was the 2 Euro wine… or maybe it was the owner Nuno.

Though his opening line, “Have you tried green wine?” might be something he uses on all the tourists, it was his warm, welcoming smile and the conversation that followed that kept us coming back.

Nuno shared his knowledge of Portuguese wines and the various wine regions, what to do around Lisbon, and even gave us tips for Porto - the next stop on our trip.

The afternoons spent chatting around the barrels, sipping wine, and watching trams go by will forever be some of my favorite memories - the perfect reward for climbing the hills of Lisbon.

If you find yourself in the Alfama area, this is one spot you won’t want to miss.

The Best Wine Bar in Lisbon, Portugal | HallAroundtheWorld
The Best Wine Bar in Lisbon, Portugal | HallAroundtheWorld
The Best Wine Bar in Lisbon, Portugal | HallAroundtheWorld

Hours + Directions

Alfama Gourmet is opened from 10am - 9pm daily.

Need help getting there? Check out the map below.


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The Best Wine Bar in Lisbon, Portugal | HallAroundtheWorld
The Best Wine Bar in Lisbon, Portugal | HallAroundtheWorld
The Best Wine Bar in Lisbon, Portugal | HallAroundtheWorld

Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores

I never imagined I’d be visiting a volcanic island in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean…

…In fact, I didn’t even know such a place existed until a few months ago when a friend and I began toying around with the idea of a little Portugal vacation.

Basically, the whole thing started when my friend Lindsey posted an instagram story saying something along the lines of “Portugal in April? Anyone want to meet me there?” To which I of course said, “Abso-freakin-lutley. Don’t tempt me with a good time.”

She sent me a photo of a hike in the Azores - One photo... Anddd that was all it took to turn my “Abso-freakin-lutely” into a “Take my money, Skyscanner.”

Plans were made, our group grew from 2 people to 5, and, in early April, we all travelled from our current homes (Malmo, Abu Dhabi, and Bangkok) to São Miguel, the largest of the nine islands in the Azores Archipelago.

It was the start of a what was an epic Portugal vacation.

If you browse photos of São Miguel Island online, you may find yourself seriously questioning the saturation levels of each shot… because there’s NO WAY a place could possibly be that green, right? Wrong. São Miguel is hands down THE GREENEST, most beautiful place I have ever been - (yes, even over Ireland).

I started to edit some of my photos from the trip, and then thought to myself… “This is pretty pointless. These photos don’t need editing at all.”

In honor of today being Earth Day, (and me proving to you just how naturally beautiful (and insanely green) this island really is), I wanted to share some of my favorite, unedited, straight off the camera shots with you.

If you’re anything like me, go ahead and get SkyScanner, Kiwi, or whatever flight search engine you use ready. It only took one picture to convince me to visit the Azores, and these 45 photos are definitely about to have you planning a trip there, too.

Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorldPhoto Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld

ANNDDD #45

…(as if you need any more convincing after all the hiking, biking, waterfalls, cows, lakes, beaches, tea fields, and green, green, green landscapes in the previous 44 photos)…

Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld

No, your eyes do not deceive you! Those are in fact bottles of wine… for less. than. 2. Euros.

So, go ahead then - Book that flight… Cash in those airline miles.

Go get a big dose of nature therapy (and your fill of cheap wine). You know you want to ;)


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Pin this post to Save it for later!

Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld
Photo Diary: 45 Unedited Photos to Convince You to Visit the Azores | HallAroundtheWorld

Interested in learning more about getting around São Miguel, where we stayed, what we did, or hearing the local take on the rise of tourism in the Azores?

Subscribe for updates below and I’ll send the latest posts straight to your inbox!

In the meantime, feel free to contact me with any questions!

Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island

Sometimes, I love a relaxing stay in a luxe hotel or meeting other travellers in buzzing hostels. Other times, it’s nice to unwind in a cozy, home away from home.

After scouring the internet for the perfect AirBnb on São Miguel Island, I found the Mirante Loft, the most unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada.

Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld

Now I know Airbnb’s can get a bad rep sometimes, and, yes… there are a few shady properties and property owners out there. Sometimes, however, you hit the AirBnb jackpot - and that’s exactly what a stay at the Mirante Loft was for us.

After a long travel day (and by long I mean a bus from home to Malmo Central Station, a train from there to Copenhagen airport, then one flight to Lisbon and a second the Azores), we finallyyyy arrived in Ponta Delgada. A short taxi ride later, and we were checking in to the beautiful Mirante Loft.

With its nearly panoramic windows, this quiet oasis in the middle of the Atlantic offers guests beautiful views of the surrounding mountains, sea, and the pineapple farm next door. The landscape views are tastefully complemented by crisp and simplistic decorations in the interior.

Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld
Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld

The property boasts several other amenities like a sparkling white, fully equipped kitchen (a must for travellers who love cooking on the road), a washer (nice for people with laundry), a living room, dining area, TV (with netflix), a balcony, andddd (BIG plus) a shower with a view.

Thoughtful little in-house touches like a deck of cards and tea light candles put this loft at the top of my list of favorite AirBnb’s. The host Joana was also extremely kind and accommodating when we needed to check out a bit later on our final day.

Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld
Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld

As far as amenities go, we had everything we needed here and more… except for the best weather conditions, but, from what we’ve heard, this is pretty typical on the island.

We did have nice enough weather to walk to the beach, down to the marina, and around the city for a bit, but, other than that, we spent a lot of our time just enjoying this amazing property and the incredible view from our little glass loft.

We sat on the balcony drinking 3 Euro bottles of wine, listening to music, and watching the weather change from one minute to the next. I’ve never seen such insanely temperamental and unpredictable weather patterns.

One minute, the clouds rolled in and the rain was pouring, and the next we’d put on our shades and soak up the blazing sun. It was a great spot to write, actually… and once my pen hit the paper, I poured more words and thoughts from my soul to my journal than I have in ages.

Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld

ANYWAY, back to the property.

As much as I’ve been raving about the interior of this place… the exterior isn’t half bad either… and by that I mean it’s pretty freakin’ fantastic. The grounds are calm, quiet, and FILLED with greenery.

The loft itself is also covered in bright green, viney plants.

If you know me, you know I’m a hugeeeee plant lover - so, yes… these green walls mighttt have played a major role in my booking decision. (They did… they definitely played a major role).

Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld
Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld
Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld

Now though the Mirante Loft DID cost a bit more per night than I typically would spend, it was totally worth it. I’m happy to report that splurging on a stay here did not disappoint.

The restaurants in Ponta Delgada are a bit far away (unless you rent a car), so we stocked up on food and drinks at the local market, and cooked our own meals (something I’d highly recommend doing anytime you have access to a kitchen so as to maximize your travel funds).

We spent money on one meal out throughout our whole stay, and the rest of the time, we saved by preparing meals in this swoon worthy (future house GOALS) kitchen.

Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld
Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld

There is so much to see and explore on São Miguel Island, but a couple of nights in Ponta Delgada at the Mirante Loft was a great starting point for us. After such a long travel day, it was nice to have a short commute from the airport to our final destination. We were able to unwind and have some quiet time before diving in to all the island has to offer.

If you’re planning to spend some time in Ponta Delgada while visiting São Miguel, I can’t recommend this AirBnb enough. Joana is an amazing host and the beautiful Mirante loft was the perfect place to stay.


BOOKING

Click here to check current rates or to book the Mirante Loft on AirBnb.

New to AirBnb? Click here to sign up and get $40 in travel credit!


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Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld
Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld
Unique AirBnb in Ponta Delgada with the Best View of São Miguel Island | HallAroundtheWorld